News Break – Planned Parenthood drops suit


In today’s News:

Planned Parenthood drops suit 

Planned Parenthood of Arizona has dropped its lawsuit against Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich, which sought to have several state regulations on abortion overturned. The suit challenged laws which mandated only physicians commit abortions, banned abortion pills dispensed via telemedicine, and required women to have an ultrasound at least 24 hours before an abortion. Despite dropping the suit, the abortion business is still pressing judges to overturn the laws. In addition, the organization announced on Oct. 24 the resignation of Bryan Howard, the CEO of Planned Parenthood of Arizona. Howard spent 36 years working for the abortion chain, 23 of which were with Planned Parenthood of Arizona. Howard had previously complained about ultrasound legislation, noting that it has led to fewer abortions being committed, meaning women have “had their life substantially disrupted.” He also falsely claimed to provide prenatal care, and opposed legislation banning discriminatory abortions committed based on the race or sex of the child.

Black pro-life leaders tell Planned Parenthood to leave 

Black pro-life leaders are telling the Planned Parenthood abortion chain to get out of their neighborhoods and stop targeting black women and unborn babies. The National Black Pro-Life Coalition recently filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, accusing the abortion chain of decades of racial discrimination, One News Now reports. Planned Parenthood itself recently admitted that its founder, Margaret Sanger, held eugenics beliefs “rooted in racism, ableism and classism” and removed her name from its New York City facility. Hundreds of Planned Parenthood employees also accused its leaders of racism earlier this year. Lori Hoye of the Issues4Life Foundation said the abortion chain needs to do more than just disavow its founder. Though abortions hurt families of every race and culture, statistics indicate that abortions disproportionately hurt the African-American community. Census data indicates that African Americans make up about 13 percent of the U.S. population, but they have about 40 percent of all abortions.

Malagasy Lutherans choose a new leader

On Nov. 5, the Malagasy Lutheran Church elected the Rev. Dr. Denis Rakotozafy to serve as its new president. The vote came during the church’s 23rd synodical conference held Nov. 4-8, which gathered under the theme: “and increase the harvest of your righteousness…” (2 Corinthians 9:10).

Same-sex marriage ban overturned 

Nevada voters overturned a ban on same-sex marriage, making it the first state to recognize gay couples’ right to marry in its constitution. The right to same-sex marriage was one four new amendments to the state constitution, which also included a voters’ bill of rights and a renewable energy mandate.

News Break – Planned Parenthood drops suit


In today’s News:

Planned Parenthood drops suit 

Planned Parenthood of Arizona has dropped its lawsuit against Arizona Attorney General Mark Brnovich, which sought to have several state regulations on abortion overturned. The suit challenged laws which mandated only physicians commit abortions, banned abortion pills dispensed via telemedicine, and required women to have an ultrasound at least 24 hours before an abortion. Despite dropping the suit, the abortion business is still pressing judges to overturn the laws. In addition, the organization announced on Oct. 24 the resignation of Bryan Howard, the CEO of Planned Parenthood of Arizona. Howard spent 36 years working for the abortion chain, 23 of which were with Planned Parenthood of Arizona. Howard had previously complained about ultrasound legislation, noting that it has led to fewer abortions being committed, meaning women have “had their life substantially disrupted.” He also falsely claimed to provide prenatal care, and opposed legislation banning discriminatory abortions committed based on the race or sex of the child.

Black pro-life leaders tell Planned Parenthood to leave 

Black pro-life leaders are telling the Planned Parenthood abortion chain to get out of their neighborhoods and stop targeting black women and unborn babies. The National Black Pro-Life Coalition recently filed a complaint with the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, accusing the abortion chain of decades of racial discrimination, One News Now reports. Planned Parenthood itself recently admitted that its founder, Margaret Sanger, held eugenics beliefs “rooted in racism, ableism and classism” and removed her name from its New York City facility. Hundreds of Planned Parenthood employees also accused its leaders of racism earlier this year. Lori Hoye of the Issues4Life Foundation said the abortion chain needs to do more than just disavow its founder. Though abortions hurt families of every race and culture, statistics indicate that abortions disproportionately hurt the African-American community. Census data indicates that African Americans make up about 13 percent of the U.S. population, but they have about 40 percent of all abortions.

Malagasy Lutherans choose a new leader

On Nov. 5, the Malagasy Lutheran Church elected the Rev. Dr. Denis Rakotozafy to serve as its new president. The vote came during the church’s 23rd synodical conference held Nov. 4-8, which gathered under the theme: “and increase the harvest of your righteousness…” (2 Corinthians 9:10).

Same-sex marriage ban overturned 

Nevada voters overturned a ban on same-sex marriage, making it the first state to recognize gay couples’ right to marry in its constitution. The right to same-sex marriage was one four new amendments to the state constitution, which also included a voters’ bill of rights and a renewable energy mandate.

Let’s Talk! The Rev. William Cwirla Is In: Keep Calm

Pastor William Cwirla of Holy Trinity Lutheran Church in Hacienda Heights, California, joins host Kip Allen on the front porch to discuss keeping calm in times of stress.


Send us your questions! Email letstalk@kfuo.org with your questions for our guest pastors.


Music for “Let’s Talk! The Pastor Is In” is Rev. Fred Baue’s rendition of “All Glory, Laud, and Honor” on his album “The Great Dance, Church Music for Guitar.” Find this album and more of Rev. Baue’s music and books, including his latest, “The Pilgrim” at PergolaPress.com.

Let’s Talk! The Rev. William Cwirla Is In: Keep Calm

Pastor William Cwirla of Holy Trinity Lutheran Church in Hacienda Heights, California, joins host Kip Allen on the front porch to discuss keeping calm in times of stress.


Send us your questions! Email letstalk@kfuo.org with your questions for our guest pastors.


Music for “Let’s Talk! The Pastor Is In” is Rev. Fred Baue’s rendition of “All Glory, Laud, and Honor” on his album “The Great Dance, Church Music for Guitar.” Find this album and more of Rev. Baue’s music and books, including his latest, “The Pilgrim” at PergolaPress.com.

News Break – Nevada church seeks equal treatment 

In today’s News:

Nevada church seeks equal treatment 

Alliance Defending Freedom attorneys representing a church filed a petition with the U.S. Supreme court yesterday that asks it to declare Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak’s coronavirus restrictions on churches unconstitutional. For months, Sisolak allowed casinos to operate at 50 percent capacity while capping churches at 50 people. That meant a casino with capacity for 2,000 could host 1,000 gamblers, while a church with the same capacity could welcome only 50 worshipers. Although the governor’s newest order increased the cap, it continues the unequal treatment by allowing casinos and other secular establishments to operate at 50 percent capacity with no cap. A procedural rule allows Calvary Chapel Dayton Valley in rural Lyon County to ask the high court to weigh in even while its lawsuit moves forward at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit; the ordinary process could result in the church being subject to unconstitutional gathering restrictions for many additional months.

Number of Christian voters declines 

The share of registered voters in the United States who say they are Christian has declined by about 15 percent since 2008 while the number of religiously unaffiliated voters has nearly doubled, Pew Research Center data suggests. Pew drew the data from a balanced survey of more than 360,000 registered voters surveyed over a 25-year span that include over 12,000 voters questioned in 2018 and 2019. The data indicate that 64 percent of all registered voters surveyed in 2019 self-identified as Christian. That figure is down from 79 percent of registered voters surveyed in 2008 who identified themselves as followers of Christ. The study shows that the decline in registered Christian voters is most stark in the Democratic Party. In 2008, 73 percent of registered democrats identified as Christian. But by 2019, only 52 percent of Democrat voters said the same. Registered Republican voters have seemingly moved away from God at a slower rate, dropping from 87 percent Christian in 2008 to 79 percent Christian in 2019. In comparison, the number of religiously unaffiliated voters has almost doubled from 15 percent to 28 percent in the same years.

‘Jesus’ no, ‘Black Lives Matter’ yes 

A Mississippi elementary school that allowed students to wear “Black Lives Matter” masks to slow the spread of the coronavirus pandemic ordered a third-grade girl to remove her “Jesus Loves Me” mask. On Monday, Alliance Defending Freedom filed a lawsuit defending her First Amendment rights. The third-grade pupil, Lydia Booth, aimed to peacefully share her Christian faith by wearing the “Jesus Lvoes Me” mask. She wore the mask without disruption or incident on Oct. 13, but the principal at her school demanded she remove and replace it. Two days later, Simpson County School District administrators announced a policy prohibiting masks that are “political, religious, sexual or inappropriate symbols, gestures or statements that may be offensive, disruptive or deemed distractive to the school environment.” According to the lawsuit, the school has allowed students to wear masks with the logos of local sports teams or even the political slogan “Black Lives Matter.”

News Break – Nevada church seeks equal treatment 

In today’s News:

Nevada church seeks equal treatment 

Alliance Defending Freedom attorneys representing a church filed a petition with the U.S. Supreme court yesterday that asks it to declare Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak’s coronavirus restrictions on churches unconstitutional. For months, Sisolak allowed casinos to operate at 50 percent capacity while capping churches at 50 people. That meant a casino with capacity for 2,000 could host 1,000 gamblers, while a church with the same capacity could welcome only 50 worshipers. Although the governor’s newest order increased the cap, it continues the unequal treatment by allowing casinos and other secular establishments to operate at 50 percent capacity with no cap. A procedural rule allows Calvary Chapel Dayton Valley in rural Lyon County to ask the high court to weigh in even while its lawsuit moves forward at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit; the ordinary process could result in the church being subject to unconstitutional gathering restrictions for many additional months.

Number of Christian voters declines 

The share of registered voters in the United States who say they are Christian has declined by about 15 percent since 2008 while the number of religiously unaffiliated voters has nearly doubled, Pew Research Center data suggests. Pew drew the data from a balanced survey of more than 360,000 registered voters surveyed over a 25-year span that include over 12,000 voters questioned in 2018 and 2019. The data indicate that 64 percent of all registered voters surveyed in 2019 self-identified as Christian. That figure is down from 79 percent of registered voters surveyed in 2008 who identified themselves as followers of Christ. The study shows that the decline in registered Christian voters is most stark in the Democratic Party. In 2008, 73 percent of registered democrats identified as Christian. But by 2019, only 52 percent of Democrat voters said the same. Registered Republican voters have seemingly moved away from God at a slower rate, dropping from 87 percent Christian in 2008 to 79 percent Christian in 2019. In comparison, the number of religiously unaffiliated voters has almost doubled from 15 percent to 28 percent in the same years.

‘Jesus’ no, ‘Black Lives Matter’ yes 

A Mississippi elementary school that allowed students to wear “Black Lives Matter” masks to slow the spread of the coronavirus pandemic ordered a third-grade girl to remove her “Jesus Loves Me” mask. On Monday, Alliance Defending Freedom filed a lawsuit defending her First Amendment rights. The third-grade pupil, Lydia Booth, aimed to peacefully share her Christian faith by wearing the “Jesus Lvoes Me” mask. She wore the mask without disruption or incident on Oct. 13, but the principal at her school demanded she remove and replace it. Two days later, Simpson County School District administrators announced a policy prohibiting masks that are “political, religious, sexual or inappropriate symbols, gestures or statements that may be offensive, disruptive or deemed distractive to the school environment.” According to the lawsuit, the school has allowed students to wear masks with the logos of local sports teams or even the political slogan “Black Lives Matter.”

News Break – Pro-life increases in House of Representatives

In today’s News:

Pro-life increases in House of Representatives

The number of pro-life Republican women in the House of Representatives will more than double in 2021, in another likely disappointment for Speaker Nancy Pelosi who has yet to see her prediction of an increased Democratic majority materialize. At least 14 pro-life women have won Houses races, and in seven cases they flipped Democrat-held seats.

Aborted babies memorialized in sculpture

A new sculpture installed at Resurrection Cemetery in The Diocese of Madison, Wisc., is dedicated to the memory of children lost to abortion. The powerful sculpture depicts a grief-stricken mother and father and their aborted daughter shown as a young child. The sculpture, called “The Memorial of Unborn Children II,” was created by Slovakian sculptor Martin Hudáček, whose “Memorial for Unborn Children” of a mother and her aborted child touched hearts in 2010. His new sculpture portrays the pain both mothers and fathers can experience after an abortion. Hudáček told Catholic World Report that people in Poland came to him with the idea of showing it isn’t only women who regret abortion and weep for their children. Fathers, too, can suffer the effects of abortion trauma.

Supreme Court heard religious freedom argument

The Supreme Court of The United States yesterday heard oral argument in Philadelphia v. Fulton, a case in which the justices will decide whether religious organizations can be disqualified from serving children and families. First Liberty filed a friend-of-the-court brief in the case on behalf of Galen Black, a plaintiff from the landmark 1990 Supreme Court Case Employment Division v. Smith. First Liberty Institute Counsel Keisha Russell said the Constitution prohibits government from punishing religious organizations for acting consistently with their sincerely held religious beliefs. The court should ensure that religious adoption providers can continue their centuries-old work serving families and children without suffering government discrimination because they believe that the best home for a child includes a mother and father.

Planned Parenthood drops a suit

Planned Parenthood’s filed a notice to a federal district court Tuesday that the abortion giant wishes to drop its lawsuit against Arizona laws that protect women considering an abortion by ensuring they have at least 24 hours to reflect and investigate after receiving critical information — in person — about abortion and available alternatives and ensuring that abortions are performed only by licensed physicians. In March, The U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona allowed Choices Pregnancy Centers of Greater Phoenix, represented by Alliance Defending Freedom attorneys, to intervene in the lawsuit, Planned Parenthood Arizona v. Brnovich, specifically to defend the 24-hour waiting period provision in Arizona law.

News Break – Pro-life increases in House of Representatives

In today’s News:

Pro-life increases in House of Representatives

The number of pro-life Republican women in the House of Representatives will more than double in 2021, in another likely disappointment for Speaker Nancy Pelosi who has yet to see her prediction of an increased Democratic majority materialize. At least 14 pro-life women have won Houses races, and in seven cases they flipped Democrat-held seats.

Aborted babies memorialized in sculpture

A new sculpture installed at Resurrection Cemetery in The Diocese of Madison, Wisc., is dedicated to the memory of children lost to abortion. The powerful sculpture depicts a grief-stricken mother and father and their aborted daughter shown as a young child. The sculpture, called “The Memorial of Unborn Children II,” was created by Slovakian sculptor Martin Hudáček, whose “Memorial for Unborn Children” of a mother and her aborted child touched hearts in 2010. His new sculpture portrays the pain both mothers and fathers can experience after an abortion. Hudáček told Catholic World Report that people in Poland came to him with the idea of showing it isn’t only women who regret abortion and weep for their children. Fathers, too, can suffer the effects of abortion trauma.

Supreme Court heard religious freedom argument

The Supreme Court of The United States yesterday heard oral argument in Philadelphia v. Fulton, a case in which the justices will decide whether religious organizations can be disqualified from serving children and families. First Liberty filed a friend-of-the-court brief in the case on behalf of Galen Black, a plaintiff from the landmark 1990 Supreme Court Case Employment Division v. Smith. First Liberty Institute Counsel Keisha Russell said the Constitution prohibits government from punishing religious organizations for acting consistently with their sincerely held religious beliefs. The court should ensure that religious adoption providers can continue their centuries-old work serving families and children without suffering government discrimination because they believe that the best home for a child includes a mother and father.

Planned Parenthood drops a suit

Planned Parenthood’s filed a notice to a federal district court Tuesday that the abortion giant wishes to drop its lawsuit against Arizona laws that protect women considering an abortion by ensuring they have at least 24 hours to reflect and investigate after receiving critical information — in person — about abortion and available alternatives and ensuring that abortions are performed only by licensed physicians. In March, The U.S. District Court for the District of Arizona allowed Choices Pregnancy Centers of Greater Phoenix, represented by Alliance Defending Freedom attorneys, to intervene in the lawsuit, Planned Parenthood Arizona v. Brnovich, specifically to defend the 24-hour waiting period provision in Arizona law.

World Lutheran News Digest – The Equality Act (Rebroadcast)

One major issue in this year’s election is the “Equality Act” which has been passed by the Democrat-controlled House on a straight partly-line vote but the Republican-controlled Senate will not hear it. Emilie Kau, director of the Richard and Helen DeVos Center for Religion & Civil Society at The Heritage Foundation, joins host Kip Allen to talk about why the “Equality Act” is dangerous to religious liberty on this episode of World Lutheran News Digest. (This is a rebroadcast from October 28, 2020.)


The World Lutheran News Digest is a Broadcast Ministry of the Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod, produced through the facilities of KFUO Radio.

World Lutheran News Digest – The Equality Act (Rebroadcast)

One major issue in this year’s election is the “Equality Act” which has been passed by the Democrat-controlled House on a straight partly-line vote but the Republican-controlled Senate will not hear it. Emilie Kau, director of the Richard and Helen DeVos Center for Religion & Civil Society at The Heritage Foundation, joins host Kip Allen to talk about why the “Equality Act” is dangerous to religious liberty on this episode of World Lutheran News Digest. (This is a rebroadcast from October 28, 2020.)


The World Lutheran News Digest is a Broadcast Ministry of the Lutheran Church—Missouri Synod, produced through the facilities of KFUO Radio.