Let’s Talk! The Rev. William Cwirla Is In: Keep Calm

Pastor William Cwirla of Holy Trinity Lutheran Church in Hacienda Heights, California, joins host Kip Allen on the front porch to discuss keeping calm in times of stress.


Send us your questions! Email letstalk@kfuo.org with your questions for our guest pastors.


Music for “Let’s Talk! The Pastor Is In” is Rev. Fred Baue’s rendition of “All Glory, Laud, and Honor” on his album “The Great Dance, Church Music for Guitar.” Find this album and more of Rev. Baue’s music and books, including his latest, “The Pilgrim” at PergolaPress.com.

Let’s Talk! The Rev. William Cwirla Is In: Keep Calm

Pastor William Cwirla of Holy Trinity Lutheran Church in Hacienda Heights, California, joins host Kip Allen on the front porch to discuss keeping calm in times of stress.


Send us your questions! Email letstalk@kfuo.org with your questions for our guest pastors.


Music for “Let’s Talk! The Pastor Is In” is Rev. Fred Baue’s rendition of “All Glory, Laud, and Honor” on his album “The Great Dance, Church Music for Guitar.” Find this album and more of Rev. Baue’s music and books, including his latest, “The Pilgrim” at PergolaPress.com.

A Moment in Scripture: History of Israel Continued

Pastor Clark and Gary discuss the history of Israel in Numbers 22-36.


Find all episodes in the Moments with KFUO Radio shows at kfuo.org/moments.

Monday: A Moment on the Lighter Side
Tuesday: A Moment in Creation
Wednesday: A Moment for the Family
Thursday: A Moment of Faith
Friday:
 A Moment in Scripture

A Moment in Scripture: History of Israel Continued

Pastor Clark and Gary discuss the history of Israel in Numbers 22-36.


Find all episodes in the Moments with KFUO Radio shows at kfuo.org/moments.

Monday: A Moment on the Lighter Side
Tuesday: A Moment in Creation
Wednesday: A Moment for the Family
Thursday: A Moment of Faith
Friday:
 A Moment in Scripture

Thy Strong Word – 2 Samuel 15: Absalom’s Kiss of Betrayal, ☧ Patient in Injustice

Rev. Brian Thieme, pastor of Trinity Lutheran Church in Columbia, Missouri, joins host Rev. AJ Espinosa to study 2 Samuel 15.

“Carry the ark of God back into the city. If I find favor in the eyes of the LORD, he will bring me back and let me see both it and his dwelling place.” Absalom repays his father’s kiss of peace with a kiss of betrayal, buying his way into the hearts of Israel. His actions are ungrateful and underhanded, but in 2 Samuel 15 King David does not respond in kind. Like Jesus Christ, he entrusts himself to God and patiently endures the injustice, knowing that God will restore his throne if it is His will, in His own time. 

Lutheran Heritage Foundation - Underwriter of Thy Strong Word
Underwriter of Thy Strong Word

Thy Strong Word is a daily in-depth study of the books of the Bible with host Rev. AJ Espinosa and guest pastors from across the country. Thy Strong Word is graciously underwritten by the Lutheran Heritage Foundation and produced by the LCMS Office of National Mission.


2 Samuel 15

Absalom’s Conspiracy

15 After this Absalom got himself a chariot and horses, and fifty men to run before him. And Absalom used to rise early and stand beside the way of the gate. And when any man had a dispute to come before the king for judgment, Absalom would call to him and say, “From what city are you?” And when he said, “Your servant is of such and such a tribe in Israel,” Absalom would say to him, “See, your claims are good and right, but there is no man designated by the king to hear you.” Then Absalom would say, “Oh that I were judge in the land! Then every man with a dispute or cause might come to me, and I would give him justice.” And whenever a man came near to pay homage to him, he would put out his hand and take hold of him and kiss him. Thus Absalom did to all of Israel who came to the king for judgment. So Absalom stole the hearts of the men of Israel.

And at the end of four[a] years Absalom said to the king, “Please let me go and pay my vow, which I have vowed to the Lord, in Hebron. For your servant vowed a vow while I lived at Geshur in Aram, saying, ‘If the Lord will indeed bring me back to Jerusalem, then I will offer worship to[b] the Lord.’” The king said to him, “Go in peace.” So he arose and went to Hebron. 10 But Absalom sent secret messengers throughout all the tribes of Israel, saying, “As soon as you hear the sound of the trumpet, then say, ‘Absalom is king at Hebron!’” 11 With Absalom went two hundred men from Jerusalem who were invited guests, and they went in their innocence and knew nothing. 12 And while Absalom was offering the sacrifices, he sent for[c] Ahithophel the Gilonite, David’s counselor, from his city Giloh. And the conspiracy grew strong, and the people with Absalom kept increasing.

David Flees Jerusalem

13 And a messenger came to David, saying, “The hearts of the men of Israel have gone after Absalom.” 14 Then David said to all his servants who were with him at Jerusalem, “Arise, and let us flee, or else there will be no escape for us from Absalom. Go quickly, lest he overtake us quickly and bring down ruin on us and strike the city with the edge of the sword.” 15 And the king’s servants said to the king, “Behold, your servants are ready to do whatever my lord the king decides.” 16 So the king went out, and all his household after him. And the king left ten concubines to keep the house. 17 And the king went out, and all the people after him. And they halted at the last house.

18 And all his servants passed by him, and all the Cherethites, and all the Pelethites, and all the six hundred Gittites who had followed him from Gath, passed on before the king. 19 Then the king said to Ittai the Gittite, “Why do you also go with us? Go back and stay with the king, for you are a foreigner and also an exile from your home. 20 You came only yesterday, and shall I today make you wander about with us, since I go I know not where? Go back and take your brothers with you, and may the Lord show[d] steadfast love and faithfulness to you.” 21 But Ittai answered the king, “As the Lord lives, and as my lord the king lives, wherever my lord the king shall be, whether for death or for life, there also will your servant be.” 22 And David said to Ittai, “Go then, pass on.” So Ittai the Gittite passed on with all his men and all the little ones who were with him. 23 And all the land wept aloud as all the people passed by, and the king crossed the brook Kidron, and all the people passed on toward the wilderness.

24 And Abiathar came up, and behold, Zadok came also with all the Levites, bearing the ark of the covenant of God. And they set down the ark of God until the people had all passed out of the city. 25 Then the king said to Zadok, “Carry the ark of God back into the city. If I find favor in the eyes of the Lord, he will bring me back and let me see both it and his dwelling place. 26 But if he says, ‘I have no pleasure in you,’ behold, here I am, let him do to me what seems good to him.” 27 The king also said to Zadok the priest, “Are you not a seer? Go back[e] to the city in peace, with your two sons, Ahimaaz your son, and Jonathan the son of Abiathar. 28 See, I will wait at the fords of the wilderness until word comes from you to inform me.” 29 So Zadok and Abiathar carried the ark of God back to Jerusalem, and they remained there.

30 But David went up the ascent of the Mount of Olives, weeping as he went, barefoot and with his head covered. And all the people who were with him covered their heads, and they went up, weeping as they went. 31 And it was told David, “Ahithophel is among the conspirators with Absalom.” And David said, “O Lord, please turn the counsel of Ahithophel into foolishness.”

32 While David was coming to the summit, where God was worshiped, behold, Hushai the Archite came to meet him with his coat torn and dirt on his head. 33 David said to him, “If you go on with me, you will be a burden to me. 34 But if you return to the city and say to Absalom, ‘I will be your servant, O king; as I have been your father’s servant in time past, so now I will be your servant,’ then you will defeat for me the counsel of Ahithophel. 35 Are not Zadok and Abiathar the priests with you there? So whatever you hear from the king’s house, tell it to Zadok and Abiathar the priests. 36 Behold, their two sons are with them there, Ahimaaz, Zadok’s son, and Jonathan, Abiathar’s son, and by them you shall send to me everything you hear.” 37 So Hushai, David’s friend, came into the city, just as Absalom was entering Jerusalem.

Footnotes

  1. 2 Samuel 15:7 Septuagint, Syriac; Hebrew forty
  2. 2 Samuel 15:8 Or will serve
  3. 2 Samuel 15:12 Or sent
  4. 2 Samuel 15:20 Septuagint; Hebrew lacks may the Lord show
  5. 2 Samuel 15:27 Septuagint The king also said to Zadok the priest, “Look, go back

English Standard Version (ESV) The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. ESV® Permanent Text Edition® (2016). Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers. esv.org

Thy Strong Word – 2 Samuel 15: Absalom’s Kiss of Betrayal, ☧ Patient in Injustice

Rev. Brian Thieme, pastor of Trinity Lutheran Church in Columbia, Missouri, joins host Rev. AJ Espinosa to study 2 Samuel 15.

“Carry the ark of God back into the city. If I find favor in the eyes of the LORD, he will bring me back and let me see both it and his dwelling place.” Absalom repays his father’s kiss of peace with a kiss of betrayal, buying his way into the hearts of Israel. His actions are ungrateful and underhanded, but in 2 Samuel 15 King David does not respond in kind. Like Jesus Christ, he entrusts himself to God and patiently endures the injustice, knowing that God will restore his throne if it is His will, in His own time. 

Lutheran Heritage Foundation - Underwriter of Thy Strong Word
Underwriter of Thy Strong Word

Thy Strong Word is a daily in-depth study of the books of the Bible with host Rev. AJ Espinosa and guest pastors from across the country. Thy Strong Word is graciously underwritten by the Lutheran Heritage Foundation and produced by the LCMS Office of National Mission.


2 Samuel 15

Absalom’s Conspiracy

15 After this Absalom got himself a chariot and horses, and fifty men to run before him. And Absalom used to rise early and stand beside the way of the gate. And when any man had a dispute to come before the king for judgment, Absalom would call to him and say, “From what city are you?” And when he said, “Your servant is of such and such a tribe in Israel,” Absalom would say to him, “See, your claims are good and right, but there is no man designated by the king to hear you.” Then Absalom would say, “Oh that I were judge in the land! Then every man with a dispute or cause might come to me, and I would give him justice.” And whenever a man came near to pay homage to him, he would put out his hand and take hold of him and kiss him. Thus Absalom did to all of Israel who came to the king for judgment. So Absalom stole the hearts of the men of Israel.

And at the end of four[a] years Absalom said to the king, “Please let me go and pay my vow, which I have vowed to the Lord, in Hebron. For your servant vowed a vow while I lived at Geshur in Aram, saying, ‘If the Lord will indeed bring me back to Jerusalem, then I will offer worship to[b] the Lord.’” The king said to him, “Go in peace.” So he arose and went to Hebron. 10 But Absalom sent secret messengers throughout all the tribes of Israel, saying, “As soon as you hear the sound of the trumpet, then say, ‘Absalom is king at Hebron!’” 11 With Absalom went two hundred men from Jerusalem who were invited guests, and they went in their innocence and knew nothing. 12 And while Absalom was offering the sacrifices, he sent for[c] Ahithophel the Gilonite, David’s counselor, from his city Giloh. And the conspiracy grew strong, and the people with Absalom kept increasing.

David Flees Jerusalem

13 And a messenger came to David, saying, “The hearts of the men of Israel have gone after Absalom.” 14 Then David said to all his servants who were with him at Jerusalem, “Arise, and let us flee, or else there will be no escape for us from Absalom. Go quickly, lest he overtake us quickly and bring down ruin on us and strike the city with the edge of the sword.” 15 And the king’s servants said to the king, “Behold, your servants are ready to do whatever my lord the king decides.” 16 So the king went out, and all his household after him. And the king left ten concubines to keep the house. 17 And the king went out, and all the people after him. And they halted at the last house.

18 And all his servants passed by him, and all the Cherethites, and all the Pelethites, and all the six hundred Gittites who had followed him from Gath, passed on before the king. 19 Then the king said to Ittai the Gittite, “Why do you also go with us? Go back and stay with the king, for you are a foreigner and also an exile from your home. 20 You came only yesterday, and shall I today make you wander about with us, since I go I know not where? Go back and take your brothers with you, and may the Lord show[d] steadfast love and faithfulness to you.” 21 But Ittai answered the king, “As the Lord lives, and as my lord the king lives, wherever my lord the king shall be, whether for death or for life, there also will your servant be.” 22 And David said to Ittai, “Go then, pass on.” So Ittai the Gittite passed on with all his men and all the little ones who were with him. 23 And all the land wept aloud as all the people passed by, and the king crossed the brook Kidron, and all the people passed on toward the wilderness.

24 And Abiathar came up, and behold, Zadok came also with all the Levites, bearing the ark of the covenant of God. And they set down the ark of God until the people had all passed out of the city. 25 Then the king said to Zadok, “Carry the ark of God back into the city. If I find favor in the eyes of the Lord, he will bring me back and let me see both it and his dwelling place. 26 But if he says, ‘I have no pleasure in you,’ behold, here I am, let him do to me what seems good to him.” 27 The king also said to Zadok the priest, “Are you not a seer? Go back[e] to the city in peace, with your two sons, Ahimaaz your son, and Jonathan the son of Abiathar. 28 See, I will wait at the fords of the wilderness until word comes from you to inform me.” 29 So Zadok and Abiathar carried the ark of God back to Jerusalem, and they remained there.

30 But David went up the ascent of the Mount of Olives, weeping as he went, barefoot and with his head covered. And all the people who were with him covered their heads, and they went up, weeping as they went. 31 And it was told David, “Ahithophel is among the conspirators with Absalom.” And David said, “O Lord, please turn the counsel of Ahithophel into foolishness.”

32 While David was coming to the summit, where God was worshiped, behold, Hushai the Archite came to meet him with his coat torn and dirt on his head. 33 David said to him, “If you go on with me, you will be a burden to me. 34 But if you return to the city and say to Absalom, ‘I will be your servant, O king; as I have been your father’s servant in time past, so now I will be your servant,’ then you will defeat for me the counsel of Ahithophel. 35 Are not Zadok and Abiathar the priests with you there? So whatever you hear from the king’s house, tell it to Zadok and Abiathar the priests. 36 Behold, their two sons are with them there, Ahimaaz, Zadok’s son, and Jonathan, Abiathar’s son, and by them you shall send to me everything you hear.” 37 So Hushai, David’s friend, came into the city, just as Absalom was entering Jerusalem.

Footnotes

  1. 2 Samuel 15:7 Septuagint, Syriac; Hebrew forty
  2. 2 Samuel 15:8 Or will serve
  3. 2 Samuel 15:12 Or sent
  4. 2 Samuel 15:20 Septuagint; Hebrew lacks may the Lord show
  5. 2 Samuel 15:27 Septuagint The king also said to Zadok the priest, “Look, go back

English Standard Version (ESV) The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. ESV® Permanent Text Edition® (2016). Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers. esv.org

News Break – Nevada church seeks equal treatment 

In today’s News:

Nevada church seeks equal treatment 

Alliance Defending Freedom attorneys representing a church filed a petition with the U.S. Supreme court yesterday that asks it to declare Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak’s coronavirus restrictions on churches unconstitutional. For months, Sisolak allowed casinos to operate at 50 percent capacity while capping churches at 50 people. That meant a casino with capacity for 2,000 could host 1,000 gamblers, while a church with the same capacity could welcome only 50 worshipers. Although the governor’s newest order increased the cap, it continues the unequal treatment by allowing casinos and other secular establishments to operate at 50 percent capacity with no cap. A procedural rule allows Calvary Chapel Dayton Valley in rural Lyon County to ask the high court to weigh in even while its lawsuit moves forward at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit; the ordinary process could result in the church being subject to unconstitutional gathering restrictions for many additional months.

Number of Christian voters declines 

The share of registered voters in the United States who say they are Christian has declined by about 15 percent since 2008 while the number of religiously unaffiliated voters has nearly doubled, Pew Research Center data suggests. Pew drew the data from a balanced survey of more than 360,000 registered voters surveyed over a 25-year span that include over 12,000 voters questioned in 2018 and 2019. The data indicate that 64 percent of all registered voters surveyed in 2019 self-identified as Christian. That figure is down from 79 percent of registered voters surveyed in 2008 who identified themselves as followers of Christ. The study shows that the decline in registered Christian voters is most stark in the Democratic Party. In 2008, 73 percent of registered democrats identified as Christian. But by 2019, only 52 percent of Democrat voters said the same. Registered Republican voters have seemingly moved away from God at a slower rate, dropping from 87 percent Christian in 2008 to 79 percent Christian in 2019. In comparison, the number of religiously unaffiliated voters has almost doubled from 15 percent to 28 percent in the same years.

‘Jesus’ no, ‘Black Lives Matter’ yes 

A Mississippi elementary school that allowed students to wear “Black Lives Matter” masks to slow the spread of the coronavirus pandemic ordered a third-grade girl to remove her “Jesus Loves Me” mask. On Monday, Alliance Defending Freedom filed a lawsuit defending her First Amendment rights. The third-grade pupil, Lydia Booth, aimed to peacefully share her Christian faith by wearing the “Jesus Lvoes Me” mask. She wore the mask without disruption or incident on Oct. 13, but the principal at her school demanded she remove and replace it. Two days later, Simpson County School District administrators announced a policy prohibiting masks that are “political, religious, sexual or inappropriate symbols, gestures or statements that may be offensive, disruptive or deemed distractive to the school environment.” According to the lawsuit, the school has allowed students to wear masks with the logos of local sports teams or even the political slogan “Black Lives Matter.”

News Break – Nevada church seeks equal treatment 

In today’s News:

Nevada church seeks equal treatment 

Alliance Defending Freedom attorneys representing a church filed a petition with the U.S. Supreme court yesterday that asks it to declare Nevada Gov. Steve Sisolak’s coronavirus restrictions on churches unconstitutional. For months, Sisolak allowed casinos to operate at 50 percent capacity while capping churches at 50 people. That meant a casino with capacity for 2,000 could host 1,000 gamblers, while a church with the same capacity could welcome only 50 worshipers. Although the governor’s newest order increased the cap, it continues the unequal treatment by allowing casinos and other secular establishments to operate at 50 percent capacity with no cap. A procedural rule allows Calvary Chapel Dayton Valley in rural Lyon County to ask the high court to weigh in even while its lawsuit moves forward at the U.S. Court of Appeals for the 9th Circuit; the ordinary process could result in the church being subject to unconstitutional gathering restrictions for many additional months.

Number of Christian voters declines 

The share of registered voters in the United States who say they are Christian has declined by about 15 percent since 2008 while the number of religiously unaffiliated voters has nearly doubled, Pew Research Center data suggests. Pew drew the data from a balanced survey of more than 360,000 registered voters surveyed over a 25-year span that include over 12,000 voters questioned in 2018 and 2019. The data indicate that 64 percent of all registered voters surveyed in 2019 self-identified as Christian. That figure is down from 79 percent of registered voters surveyed in 2008 who identified themselves as followers of Christ. The study shows that the decline in registered Christian voters is most stark in the Democratic Party. In 2008, 73 percent of registered democrats identified as Christian. But by 2019, only 52 percent of Democrat voters said the same. Registered Republican voters have seemingly moved away from God at a slower rate, dropping from 87 percent Christian in 2008 to 79 percent Christian in 2019. In comparison, the number of religiously unaffiliated voters has almost doubled from 15 percent to 28 percent in the same years.

‘Jesus’ no, ‘Black Lives Matter’ yes 

A Mississippi elementary school that allowed students to wear “Black Lives Matter” masks to slow the spread of the coronavirus pandemic ordered a third-grade girl to remove her “Jesus Loves Me” mask. On Monday, Alliance Defending Freedom filed a lawsuit defending her First Amendment rights. The third-grade pupil, Lydia Booth, aimed to peacefully share her Christian faith by wearing the “Jesus Lvoes Me” mask. She wore the mask without disruption or incident on Oct. 13, but the principal at her school demanded she remove and replace it. Two days later, Simpson County School District administrators announced a policy prohibiting masks that are “political, religious, sexual or inappropriate symbols, gestures or statements that may be offensive, disruptive or deemed distractive to the school environment.” According to the lawsuit, the school has allowed students to wear masks with the logos of local sports teams or even the political slogan “Black Lives Matter.”

{The Lutheran Ladies’ Lounge} Bri’s Big Question: How to Survive Election Season

In this week’s episode (recorded days before Election Day 2020), Bri asks a timely and relevant “Big Question”: How do I survive election season as a Lutheran woman?

In the honest and open conversation that follows, Sarah, Erin, Bri, and Rachel cover a range of topics and ideas at the intersection of Lutheran faith and politics: voting out of love for our neighbors, trusting “not in princes,” and finding our ultimate identity in Christ — not political party affiliations. They also touch on the place of social media in political discourse, the value of secret ballots, the way voting priorities change as you age, and whether or not this year’s election is actually the most contentious in American political history.

In the end, Bri reminds us that whether we vote red or blue (or something else entirely), we are sisters in Christ, and we are loved.

Learn more about the following resources mentioned or quoted in the episode:


Connect with the Lutheran ladies on social media in The Lutheran Ladies’ Lounge Facebook discussion group (facebook.com/groups/LutheranLadiesLounge) and follow Sarah (@mrsbaseballpants), Rachel (@rachbomberger), Erin (@erin.alter), and Bri (@grrrzevske) on Instagram.


The Lutheran Ladies Lounge is the podcast produced by KFUO Radio and hosted by Sarah Gulseth, Erin Alter, Rachel Bomberger, and Bri Gerzevske. Created for Lutheran ladies to have a place to escape to with inviting conversations, laughter, and fellowship with Lutheran sisters, we invite all of you Lutheran ladies to join Sarah, Erin, Rachel, and Bri on the sofa in the Lutheran Ladies Lounge to sit, rest your feet, and stay a while. If you’re a Lutheran lady, join us in our Facebook group: facebook.com/groups/LutheranLadiesLounge.

{The Lutheran Ladies’ Lounge} Bri’s Big Question: How to Survive Election Season

In this week’s episode (recorded days before Election Day 2020), Bri asks a timely and relevant “Big Question”: How do I survive election season as a Lutheran woman?

In the honest and open conversation that follows, Sarah, Erin, Bri, and Rachel cover a range of topics and ideas at the intersection of Lutheran faith and politics: voting out of love for our neighbors, trusting “not in princes,” and finding our ultimate identity in Christ — not political party affiliations. They also touch on the place of social media in political discourse, the value of secret ballots, the way voting priorities change as you age, and whether or not this year’s election is actually the most contentious in American political history.

In the end, Bri reminds us that whether we vote red or blue (or something else entirely), we are sisters in Christ, and we are loved.

Learn more about the following resources mentioned or quoted in the episode:


Connect with the Lutheran ladies on social media in The Lutheran Ladies’ Lounge Facebook discussion group (facebook.com/groups/LutheranLadiesLounge) and follow Sarah (@mrsbaseballpants), Rachel (@rachbomberger), Erin (@erin.alter), and Bri (@grrrzevske) on Instagram.


The Lutheran Ladies Lounge is the podcast produced by KFUO Radio and hosted by Sarah Gulseth, Erin Alter, Rachel Bomberger, and Bri Gerzevske. Created for Lutheran ladies to have a place to escape to with inviting conversations, laughter, and fellowship with Lutheran sisters, we invite all of you Lutheran ladies to join Sarah, Erin, Rachel, and Bri on the sofa in the Lutheran Ladies Lounge to sit, rest your feet, and stay a while. If you’re a Lutheran lady, join us in our Facebook group: facebook.com/groups/LutheranLadiesLounge.