Let’s Talk! The Rev. Wayne Lawrence Is In: What is a Lutheran?

Pastor Wayne Lawrence of St. James Lutheran Church in University City, Mo., joins host Kip Allen on the front porch to talk about how to answer when someone asks, “What’s a Lutheran?”.


Send us your questions! Email letstalk@kfuo.org with your questions for our guest pastors.


Music for “Let’s Talk! The Pastor Is In” is Rev. Fred Baue’s rendition of “All Glory, Laud, and Honor” on his album “The Great Dance, Church Music for Guitar.” Find this album and more of Rev. Baue’s music and books, including his latest, “The Pilgrim” at PergolaPress.com.

Let’s Talk! The Rev. Wayne Lawrence Is In: What is a Lutheran?

Pastor Wayne Lawrence of St. James Lutheran Church in University City, Mo., joins host Kip Allen on the front porch to talk about how to answer when someone asks, “What’s a Lutheran?”.


Send us your questions! Email letstalk@kfuo.org with your questions for our guest pastors.


Music for “Let’s Talk! The Pastor Is In” is Rev. Fred Baue’s rendition of “All Glory, Laud, and Honor” on his album “The Great Dance, Church Music for Guitar.” Find this album and more of Rev. Baue’s music and books, including his latest, “The Pilgrim” at PergolaPress.com.

A Moment in Scripture: History of Israel

Pastor Clark and Gary discuss the history of Israel in Numbers 9-21.


Find all episodes in the Moments with KFUO Radio shows at kfuo.org/moments.

Monday: A Moment on the Lighter Side
Tuesday: A Moment in Creation
Wednesday: A Moment for the Family
Thursday: A Moment of Faith
Friday:
 A Moment in Scripture

A Moment in Scripture: History of Israel

Pastor Clark and Gary discuss the history of Israel in Numbers 9-21.


Find all episodes in the Moments with KFUO Radio shows at kfuo.org/moments.

Monday: A Moment on the Lighter Side
Tuesday: A Moment in Creation
Wednesday: A Moment for the Family
Thursday: A Moment of Faith
Friday:
 A Moment in Scripture

Thy Strong Word – 2 Samuel 11: David Betrays Uriah, Bathsheba Blessed for ☧

Rev. Warren Woerth, pastor of Good Shepherd Lutheran Church in Arnold, Missouri, joins host Rev. AJ Espinosa to study 2 Samuel 11.

“And the woman conceived, and she sent and told David, ‘I am pregnant.’ So David sent word to Joab, ‘Send me Uriah the Hittite.’” This one sin is the action around which the rest of 2 Samuel revolves; and it doesn’t remain one sin for long, evolving into murder and the abuse of God’s name. Chapter 11 gives a sobering warning about how sin can come seemingly out of nowhere (“in the spring […] late one afternoon”). Like Saul, despite years of faithful service, now David also deserves to fall from power. Rather than casting blame on Bathsheba or blaming David’s circumstances, we should see our own sin in David and Joab, who foremost cared about their image and their career. It was not God’s will that David sin, but that the Savior would be born to offer forgiveness for every kind of sin.

Lutheran Heritage Foundation - Underwriter of Thy Strong Word
Underwriter of Thy Strong Word

Thy Strong Word is a daily in-depth study of the books of the Bible with host Rev. AJ Espinosa and guest pastors from across the country. Thy Strong Word is graciously underwritten by the Lutheran Heritage Foundation and produced by the LCMS Office of National Mission.


2 Samuel 11

David and Bathsheba

11 In the spring of the year, the time when kings go out to battle, David sent Joab, and his servants with him, and all Israel. And they ravaged the Ammonites and besieged Rabbah. But David remained at Jerusalem.

It happened, late one afternoon, when David arose from his couch and was walking on the roof of the king’s house, that he saw from the roof a woman bathing; and the woman was very beautiful. And David sent and inquired about the woman. And one said, “Is not this Bathsheba, the daughter of Eliam, the wife of Uriah the Hittite?” So David sent messengers and took her, and she came to him, and he lay with her. (Now she had been purifying herself from her uncleanness.) Then she returned to her house. And the woman conceived, and she sent and told David, “I am pregnant.”

So David sent word to Joab, “Send me Uriah the Hittite.” And Joab sent Uriah to David. When Uriah came to him, David asked how Joab was doing and how the people were doing and how the war was going. Then David said to Uriah, “Go down to your house and wash your feet.” And Uriah went out of the king’s house, and there followed him a present from the king. But Uriah slept at the door of the king’s house with all the servants of his lord, and did not go down to his house. 10 When they told David, “Uriah did not go down to his house,” David said to Uriah, “Have you not come from a journey? Why did you not go down to your house?” 11 Uriah said to David, “The ark and Israel and Judah dwell in booths, and my lord Joab and the servants of my lord are camping in the open field. Shall I then go to my house, to eat and to drink and to lie with my wife? As you live, and as your soul lives, I will not do this thing.” 12 Then David said to Uriah, “Remain here today also, and tomorrow I will send you back.” So Uriah remained in Jerusalem that day and the next. 13 And David invited him, and he ate in his presence and drank, so that he made him drunk. And in the evening he went out to lie on his couch with the servants of his lord, but he did not go down to his house.

14 In the morning David wrote a letter to Joab and sent it by the hand of Uriah. 15 In the letter he wrote, “Set Uriah in the forefront of the hardest fighting, and then draw back from him, that he may be struck down, and die.” 16 And as Joab was besieging the city, he assigned Uriah to the place where he knew there were valiant men. 17 And the men of the city came out and fought with Joab, and some of the servants of David among the people fell. Uriah the Hittite also died. 18 Then Joab sent and told David all the news about the fighting. 19 And he instructed the messenger, “When you have finished telling all the news about the fighting to the king, 20 then, if the king’s anger rises, and if he says to you, ‘Why did you go so near the city to fight? Did you not know that they would shoot from the wall? 21 Who killed Abimelech the son of Jerubbesheth? Did not a woman cast an upper millstone on him from the wall, so that he died at Thebez? Why did you go so near the wall?’ then you shall say, ‘Your servant Uriah the Hittite is dead also.’”

22 So the messenger went and came and told David all that Joab had sent him to tell. 23 The messenger said to David, “The men gained an advantage over us and came out against us in the field, but we drove them back to the entrance of the gate. 24 Then the archers shot at your servants from the wall. Some of the king’s servants are dead, and your servant Uriah the Hittite is dead also.” 25 David said to the messenger, “Thus shall you say to Joab, ‘Do not let this matter displease you, for the sword devours now one and now another. Strengthen your attack against the city and overthrow it.’ And encourage him.”

26 When the wife of Uriah heard that Uriah her husband was dead, she lamented over her husband. 27 And when the mourning was over, David sent and brought her to his house, and she became his wife and bore him a son. But the thing that David had done displeased the Lord.

English Standard Version (ESV) The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. ESV® Permanent Text Edition® (2016). Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers. esv.org

Thy Strong Word – 2 Samuel 11: David Betrays Uriah, Bathsheba Blessed for ☧

Rev. Warren Woerth, pastor of Good Shepherd Lutheran Church in Arnold, Missouri, joins host Rev. AJ Espinosa to study 2 Samuel 11.

“And the woman conceived, and she sent and told David, ‘I am pregnant.’ So David sent word to Joab, ‘Send me Uriah the Hittite.’” This one sin is the action around which the rest of 2 Samuel revolves; and it doesn’t remain one sin for long, evolving into murder and the abuse of God’s name. Chapter 11 gives a sobering warning about how sin can come seemingly out of nowhere (“in the spring […] late one afternoon”). Like Saul, despite years of faithful service, now David also deserves to fall from power. Rather than casting blame on Bathsheba or blaming David’s circumstances, we should see our own sin in David and Joab, who foremost cared about their image and their career. It was not God’s will that David sin, but that the Savior would be born to offer forgiveness for every kind of sin.

Lutheran Heritage Foundation - Underwriter of Thy Strong Word
Underwriter of Thy Strong Word

Thy Strong Word is a daily in-depth study of the books of the Bible with host Rev. AJ Espinosa and guest pastors from across the country. Thy Strong Word is graciously underwritten by the Lutheran Heritage Foundation and produced by the LCMS Office of National Mission.


2 Samuel 11

David and Bathsheba

11 In the spring of the year, the time when kings go out to battle, David sent Joab, and his servants with him, and all Israel. And they ravaged the Ammonites and besieged Rabbah. But David remained at Jerusalem.

It happened, late one afternoon, when David arose from his couch and was walking on the roof of the king’s house, that he saw from the roof a woman bathing; and the woman was very beautiful. And David sent and inquired about the woman. And one said, “Is not this Bathsheba, the daughter of Eliam, the wife of Uriah the Hittite?” So David sent messengers and took her, and she came to him, and he lay with her. (Now she had been purifying herself from her uncleanness.) Then she returned to her house. And the woman conceived, and she sent and told David, “I am pregnant.”

So David sent word to Joab, “Send me Uriah the Hittite.” And Joab sent Uriah to David. When Uriah came to him, David asked how Joab was doing and how the people were doing and how the war was going. Then David said to Uriah, “Go down to your house and wash your feet.” And Uriah went out of the king’s house, and there followed him a present from the king. But Uriah slept at the door of the king’s house with all the servants of his lord, and did not go down to his house. 10 When they told David, “Uriah did not go down to his house,” David said to Uriah, “Have you not come from a journey? Why did you not go down to your house?” 11 Uriah said to David, “The ark and Israel and Judah dwell in booths, and my lord Joab and the servants of my lord are camping in the open field. Shall I then go to my house, to eat and to drink and to lie with my wife? As you live, and as your soul lives, I will not do this thing.” 12 Then David said to Uriah, “Remain here today also, and tomorrow I will send you back.” So Uriah remained in Jerusalem that day and the next. 13 And David invited him, and he ate in his presence and drank, so that he made him drunk. And in the evening he went out to lie on his couch with the servants of his lord, but he did not go down to his house.

14 In the morning David wrote a letter to Joab and sent it by the hand of Uriah. 15 In the letter he wrote, “Set Uriah in the forefront of the hardest fighting, and then draw back from him, that he may be struck down, and die.” 16 And as Joab was besieging the city, he assigned Uriah to the place where he knew there were valiant men. 17 And the men of the city came out and fought with Joab, and some of the servants of David among the people fell. Uriah the Hittite also died. 18 Then Joab sent and told David all the news about the fighting. 19 And he instructed the messenger, “When you have finished telling all the news about the fighting to the king, 20 then, if the king’s anger rises, and if he says to you, ‘Why did you go so near the city to fight? Did you not know that they would shoot from the wall? 21 Who killed Abimelech the son of Jerubbesheth? Did not a woman cast an upper millstone on him from the wall, so that he died at Thebez? Why did you go so near the wall?’ then you shall say, ‘Your servant Uriah the Hittite is dead also.’”

22 So the messenger went and came and told David all that Joab had sent him to tell. 23 The messenger said to David, “The men gained an advantage over us and came out against us in the field, but we drove them back to the entrance of the gate. 24 Then the archers shot at your servants from the wall. Some of the king’s servants are dead, and your servant Uriah the Hittite is dead also.” 25 David said to the messenger, “Thus shall you say to Joab, ‘Do not let this matter displease you, for the sword devours now one and now another. Strengthen your attack against the city and overthrow it.’ And encourage him.”

26 When the wife of Uriah heard that Uriah her husband was dead, she lamented over her husband. 27 And when the mourning was over, David sent and brought her to his house, and she became his wife and bore him a son. But the thing that David had done displeased the Lord.

English Standard Version (ESV) The Holy Bible, English Standard Version. ESV® Permanent Text Edition® (2016). Copyright © 2001 by Crossway Bibles, a publishing ministry of Good News Publishers. esv.org

News Break – Planned Parenthood lied 

In today’s News:

Planned Parenthood lied 

The Center for Medical Progress released a fourth video yesterday featuring unsealed video clips from Planned Parenthood leaders’ sworn deposition testimony about the abortion provider’s fetal tissue research programs — Including details about the programs that directly contradict What Planned Parenthood told multiple Congressional investigations in 2015 and 2016. While under investigation by the Senate Judiciary Committee and House Select Investigative Panel, Planned Parenthood told congress that its Houston affiliate, Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast, never had a “fetal” tissue research program — only a “placental” tissue program — with researchers at University of Texas Medical Branch. Based on this representation, Planned Parenthood produced less documentation of Planned Parenthood’s practices than other regional offices in California. But when questioned under oath about the transactions with University of Texas, Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast’s Vice President for Research, Melissa Farrell, testifies that her Planned Parenthood office in fact transferred the entire aborted fetus to the university, not just the placenta. Farrell testifies that in previous fetal tissue transactions, Planned Parenthood transferred the “products of conception” from the abortion — the fetus, placenta, and everything removed in the abortion — “in its entirety.”

Fundraising effort halted 

GoFundMe has shut down the efforts of parents attempting to raise money to display billboards that say, “Puberty is not a medical condition” for violating its user rules. The fundraising effort, which was inspired by A Los Angeles-area father of a gender-confused teenaged daughter who put up one such billboard near West Hollywood, was taken down Wednesday on the widely used crowdfunding site. The father has received no specific response from GoFundMe as to why his page was removed. The billboard that was erected last week in California and will be there for one month states: “Your child is learning about gender identity in school. Puberty is not a medical condition. Get the facts. Read this book.” the message was positioned next to the cover of the recent book “Irreversible Damage: The Transgender Craze Seducing Our Daughters” by Wall Street Journal contributor Abigail Shrier.

California restricts family Thanksgiving gatherings 

California Department of Public Health officials are cracking down on family Thanksgiving celebrations with a host of restrictions. All gatherings must include no more than three households, including hosts and guests, and must be held outdoors, lasting for two hours of less. The department further states that gatherings that occur outdoors are significantly safer than indoor gatherings. All gatherings must be held outside. Attendees may go inside to use restrooms as long as the restrooms are frequently sanitized,” the statement added. The department adds that citizens can remove their masks while they’re eating or drinking, or for health reasons, such as if the individual is feeling light-headed or needs to use their asthma inhaler.

News Break – Planned Parenthood lied 

In today’s News:

Planned Parenthood lied 

The Center for Medical Progress released a fourth video yesterday featuring unsealed video clips from Planned Parenthood leaders’ sworn deposition testimony about the abortion provider’s fetal tissue research programs — Including details about the programs that directly contradict What Planned Parenthood told multiple Congressional investigations in 2015 and 2016. While under investigation by the Senate Judiciary Committee and House Select Investigative Panel, Planned Parenthood told congress that its Houston affiliate, Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast, never had a “fetal” tissue research program — only a “placental” tissue program — with researchers at University of Texas Medical Branch. Based on this representation, Planned Parenthood produced less documentation of Planned Parenthood’s practices than other regional offices in California. But when questioned under oath about the transactions with University of Texas, Planned Parenthood Gulf Coast’s Vice President for Research, Melissa Farrell, testifies that her Planned Parenthood office in fact transferred the entire aborted fetus to the university, not just the placenta. Farrell testifies that in previous fetal tissue transactions, Planned Parenthood transferred the “products of conception” from the abortion — the fetus, placenta, and everything removed in the abortion — “in its entirety.”

Fundraising effort halted 

GoFundMe has shut down the efforts of parents attempting to raise money to display billboards that say, “Puberty is not a medical condition” for violating its user rules. The fundraising effort, which was inspired by A Los Angeles-area father of a gender-confused teenaged daughter who put up one such billboard near West Hollywood, was taken down Wednesday on the widely used crowdfunding site. The father has received no specific response from GoFundMe as to why his page was removed. The billboard that was erected last week in California and will be there for one month states: “Your child is learning about gender identity in school. Puberty is not a medical condition. Get the facts. Read this book.” the message was positioned next to the cover of the recent book “Irreversible Damage: The Transgender Craze Seducing Our Daughters” by Wall Street Journal contributor Abigail Shrier.

California restricts family Thanksgiving gatherings 

California Department of Public Health officials are cracking down on family Thanksgiving celebrations with a host of restrictions. All gatherings must include no more than three households, including hosts and guests, and must be held outdoors, lasting for two hours of less. The department further states that gatherings that occur outdoors are significantly safer than indoor gatherings. All gatherings must be held outside. Attendees may go inside to use restrooms as long as the restrooms are frequently sanitized,” the statement added. The department adds that citizens can remove their masks while they’re eating or drinking, or for health reasons, such as if the individual is feeling light-headed or needs to use their asthma inhaler.

{The Lutheran Ladies’ Lounge} Story Time with Sarah: Anna of Denmark, Electress of Saxony

Anna of Denmark, Electress of Saxony
“Anna of Denmark, Electress of Saxony” By Lucas Cranach the Younger – 1. Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien, Bilddatenbank.2. GalleriX, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4854884

Anna of Denmark (1532–1585) was a Danish princess from the House of Oldenburg who became Electress of Saxony through her marriage to Augustus of Saxony in 1548. As one of the most influential women in post-Reformation Europe, she played a vital role in preserving and promoting Orthodox Lutheranism in the years following Martin Luther’s death in 1546.

In this “Story Time with Sarah” episode, the Lutheran Ladies revisit the life and times of the energetic electress, celebrating Anna’s prowess as a horticultural and proto-pharmaceutical scientist, her faithfulness as a wife and mother, and — especially — her staunch advocacy and support for Lutheran theology and practice in the Holy Roman Empire.

Click here to listen to last year’s Women of the Reformation trivia challenge, or to learn more about Anna of Denmark, Electress of Saxony.

Sources listed in this episode:
Brian J. Hale: “Anna of Saxony and Her Library.” Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal. Vol. 9, No. 1. Fall 2014, p. 101-114
Pernille Arenfeldt: “Gendered Patronage and Confessionalization.” Renaissance Women as Patrons of Art and Culture. Renaessanceforum 4. 2008. www.renaessanceforum.dk.


Connect with the Lutheran ladies on social media in The Lutheran Ladies’ Lounge Facebook discussion group (facebook.com/groups/LutheranLadiesLounge) and follow Sarah (@mrsbaseballpants), Rachel (@rachbomberger), Erin (@erin.alter), and Bri (@grrrzevske) on Instagram.


The Lutheran Ladies Lounge is the podcast produced by KFUO Radio and hosted by Sarah Gulseth, Erin Alter, Rachel Bomberger, and Bri Gerzevske. Created for Lutheran ladies to have a place to escape to with inviting conversations, laughter, and fellowship with Lutheran sisters, we invite all of you Lutheran ladies to join Sarah, Erin, Rachel, and Bri on the sofa in the Lutheran Ladies Lounge to sit, rest your feet, and stay a while. If you’re a Lutheran lady, join us in our Facebook group: facebook.com/groups/LutheranLadiesLounge.

{The Lutheran Ladies’ Lounge} Story Time with Sarah: Anna of Denmark, Electress of Saxony

Anna of Denmark, Electress of Saxony
“Anna of Denmark, Electress of Saxony” By Lucas Cranach the Younger – 1. Kunsthistorisches Museum Wien, Bilddatenbank.2. GalleriX, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=4854884

Anna of Denmark (1532–1585) was a Danish princess from the House of Oldenburg who became Electress of Saxony through her marriage to Augustus of Saxony in 1548. As one of the most influential women in post-Reformation Europe, she played a vital role in preserving and promoting Orthodox Lutheranism in the years following Martin Luther’s death in 1546.

In this “Story Time with Sarah” episode, the Lutheran Ladies revisit the life and times of the energetic electress, celebrating Anna’s prowess as a horticultural and proto-pharmaceutical scientist, her faithfulness as a wife and mother, and — especially — her staunch advocacy and support for Lutheran theology and practice in the Holy Roman Empire.

Click here to listen to last year’s Women of the Reformation trivia challenge, or to learn more about Anna of Denmark, Electress of Saxony.

Sources listed in this episode:
Brian J. Hale: “Anna of Saxony and Her Library.” Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal. Vol. 9, No. 1. Fall 2014, p. 101-114
Pernille Arenfeldt: “Gendered Patronage and Confessionalization.” Renaissance Women as Patrons of Art and Culture. Renaessanceforum 4. 2008. www.renaessanceforum.dk.


Connect with the Lutheran ladies on social media in The Lutheran Ladies’ Lounge Facebook discussion group (facebook.com/groups/LutheranLadiesLounge) and follow Sarah (@mrsbaseballpants), Rachel (@rachbomberger), Erin (@erin.alter), and Bri (@grrrzevske) on Instagram.


The Lutheran Ladies Lounge is the podcast produced by KFUO Radio and hosted by Sarah Gulseth, Erin Alter, Rachel Bomberger, and Bri Gerzevske. Created for Lutheran ladies to have a place to escape to with inviting conversations, laughter, and fellowship with Lutheran sisters, we invite all of you Lutheran ladies to join Sarah, Erin, Rachel, and Bri on the sofa in the Lutheran Ladies Lounge to sit, rest your feet, and stay a while. If you’re a Lutheran lady, join us in our Facebook group: facebook.com/groups/LutheranLadiesLounge.